Avio Aero 3Dprints parts for the Catalyst engine for the Cessna Denali

Up to ten GE Catalyst components will be produced in this area. The engine’s first flight is scheduled for the end of 2019. It is the first turboprop engine in the world with almost 30% of its internal metal parts 3D printed. In Brindisi, work has already begun on three of these ten additive components. This number will continue to grow as the number of GE Additive-Concept Laser machines DMLM (Direct Metal Laser Melting) does. Continue reading “Avio Aero 3Dprints parts for the Catalyst engine for the Cessna Denali”

Dutch Railways starts using 3D printed spare parts for trains

Dutch Railways starts using 3D printed spare parts for trains

Nederlandse Spoorwegen (NS, Dutch Railways) is taking advantage of 3D printing and will replace some broken train parts with 3D printed replacement parts. In fact, 20 3D printed spare parts are currently available and NS plans to produce more than 50 by the end of the year. Continue reading “Dutch Railways starts using 3D printed spare parts for trains”

Researchers 3D print all-liquid material that could be used to construct liquid electronics (video)

Researchers 3D print all-liquid material that could be used to construct liquid electronics

Scientists from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a way to print 3-D structures composed entirely of liquids. Using a modified 3-D printer, they injected threads of water into silicone oil — sculpting tubes made of one liquid within another liquid.

They envision their all-liquid material could be used to construct liquid electronics that power flexible, stretchable devices. The scientists also foresee chemically tuning the tubes and flowing molecules through them, leading to new ways to separate molecules or precisely deliver nanoscale building blocks to under-construction compounds. Continue reading “Researchers 3D print all-liquid material that could be used to construct liquid electronics (video)”

TU Wien Spin-Off Cubicure introduces new 3D Printing materials

While 3D printing technology has been responsible for many advances and inventions over the years, it’s not foolproof – some methods don’t produce items with the best material properties, and others result in surfaces that are rough and unclean. The Vienna University of Technology, better known as TU Wien, is responsible for many innovations in 3D printing materials. The university also generated a spin-off company, the startup Cubicure, which developed a new 3D printing technique called hot lithography.

TU Wien has spent years developing 3D printing processes, along with material mixtures that are well-suited for a wide variety of applications. Cubicure is a direct result of this research.

Dr. Robert Gmeiner, CEO of Cubicure, said, “3D printing already plays a key role in the production of prototypes or utility models. But even for all industrial products that are produced in small quantities or have to be tailored to the individual needs of the individual customer – such as components in the medical sector – the high-quality 3D printing offers great opportunities.” Continue reading “TU Wien Spin-Off Cubicure introduces new 3D Printing materials”

3D printed concrete walls more stable with mechanistic model developed by TU/e researcher

A professor of Applied Mechanics at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands has developed a model for determining the dimensions and printing speeds needed to keep 3D printed concrete walls stable.

Construction 3D printing is an exciting area of additive manufacturing, but 3D printing with concrete-type materials doesn’t come without its problems. This is basically because 3D printed concrete is asked to do a lot more work than it is used to: while normal concrete deposited in formwork can harden over several weeks, 3D printed concrete needs to carry the burden of the next layer almost immediately after its deposition. Continue reading “3D printed concrete walls more stable with mechanistic model developed by TU/e researcher”

TU/e researcher develops mechanistic model to keep 3D printed concrete walls stable

A professor of Applied Mechanics at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands has developed a model for determining the dimensions and printing speeds needed to keep 3D printed concrete walls stable.

Construction 3D printing is an exciting area of additive manufacturing, but 3D printing with concrete-type materials doesn’t come without its problems. This is basically because 3D printed concrete is asked to do a lot more work than it is used to: while normal concrete deposited in formwork can harden over several weeks, 3D printed concrete needs to carry the burden of the next layer almost immediately after its deposition. Continue reading “TU/e researcher develops mechanistic model to keep 3D printed concrete walls stable”

Autonomous 3D scanner determines 3D printability of objects in real time

Let’s say the armrest is broken in your vintage car. As things stand, you would need a lot of luck and persistence to find the right spare part. But in the world of Industrie 4.0 and production with batch sizes of one, you can simply scan the armrest and print it out. This is made possible by the first ever 3D scanner capable of working autonomously and in real time.

Part of the charm of vintage cars is that they stopped making them long ago, so it is special when you do see one out on the roads. If something breaks or stops working in the vehicle, however, this special status quickly becomes a problem, as spare parts are no longer manufactured either. With the advent of Industrie 4.0, this is set to change: manufacturing is turning toward batch sizes of one and individualized production. This is sometimes also referred to as “highly customized mass production.” Continue reading “Autonomous 3D scanner determines 3D printability of objects in real time”

Colour-changing 3D Printables, with custom ink & ultraviolet light (Video)

3-D printing has come a long way since the first rapid prototyping patent was rejected in 1980. The technology has evolved from basic designs to a wide range of highly-customizable objects. Still, there’s a big issue: Once objects are printed, they’re final. If you need a change, you’ll need a reprint.

But imagine if that weren’t the case — if, for example, you could change the color of your smartphone case or earrings on demand.

Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have gotten closer to making that a reality. In a new paper, they present ColorMod, a method for repeatedly changing the colors of 3-D printed objects, after fabrication.

Using their own 3-D printable ink that changes color when exposed to ultraviolet light, the team can recolor a multicolored object in just over 20 minutes — and they say they expect that number to decrease significantly with future improvements. Continue reading “Colour-changing 3D Printables, with custom ink & ultraviolet light (Video)”

Spare parts stored digitally & 3D printed when needed, a competitive advantage (Video)

Spare parts stored digitally & 3D printed when needed, a competitive advantage

Five percent of spare parts could currently be stored in digital warehouses. This would make parts more quickly and easily available, while creating considerable cost savings. Digitalisation will also enable individual customisation and an increase in the intelligence of parts. 

A two-year project involving companies, and led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Aalto University, investigated how businesses can gain a competitive advantage from digital spare parts.

Spare parts and all of the related information can be stored and transferred digitally. Availability increases when a new spare part can be 3D-printed according to need, close to the end user.

“Industry now has every opportunity to boost business by making spare parts into a focus area of development. Around five percent of parts can currently be manufactured digitally, according to need. 3D printing technology has reached the stage where high-quality manufacturing is possible,” says Sini Metsä-Kortelainen, VTT’s project manager for the project. Continue reading “Spare parts stored digitally & 3D printed when needed, a competitive advantage (Video)”

3D Printing in a Fraction of the Time (Video)

3D Printing in a Fraction of the Time

By using laser-generated, hologram-like 3D images flashed into photosensitive resin, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, along with academic collaborators, have discovered they can build complex 3D parts in a fraction of the time of traditional layer-by-layer printing. With this process, researchers have printed beams, planes, struts at arbitrary angles, lattices and complex and uniquely curved objects in a matter of seconds.

While additive manufacturing (AM), commonly known as 3D printing, is enabling engineers and scientists to build parts in configurations and designs never before possible, the impact of the technology has been limited by layer-based printing methods, which can take up to hours or days to build three-dimensional parts, depending on their complexity. Continue reading “3D Printing in a Fraction of the Time (Video)”