Volcano Models 3D Printed to Point Out Hazards

Now Dr. Ian Saginor — an Associate Professor of Geology at Keystone College and a geochemist, geochronologist, and volcanologist who has spent the past nine years studying volcanoes throughout Central America and the Caribbean — is seeking funds to 3D print examples of volcanoes for study purposes on GoFundMe.

In 1815, the eruption of Mount Tambora in Indonesia began in April and ultimately lowered global temperatures, leading to 1816 becoming known as the Year Without a Summer.

A moderate-sized eruption occurred earlier that month, and it was soon followed by thunderous detonation sounds which were heard nearly 1600 miles away. Lava flows rolled down the mountain to the sea and in the process, wiped out the entire village of Tambora.

The explosion is said to have been a VEI-7 event which released roughly 4 times the energy of the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, the most famous volcano event outside of the disaster at Mount Vesuvius.

Before the explosion, Mount Tambora was 14,000 feet high and one of the tallest peaks on the Indonesian archipelago. Following the blast, it was reduced to 9,300 feet. It was the single largest observed volcanic eruption in recorded history; ash fell to earth more than 800 miles away from the eruption site, and it remained completely dark in the area up to 400 miles away. Surrounding Indonesian islands were swamped by a tsunami with waves of up to 13 feet high. … (read more)

Source: 3Dprint.com

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