New 3D printing DRM copies Netflix’s moves to blockade physical pirates

Once 3D printing becomes mainstream, manufacturing companies fear that open season will basically be declared for piracy of physical goods–just as digital downloads reshaped the music industry. Why purchase that fancy new iPhone case, after all, when you can just grab the digital CAD file for free from a website and print it at home for just the cost of some plastic filament?

Once 3D printing becomes mainstream, manufacturing companies fear that open season will basically be declared for piracy of physical goods–just as digital downloads reshaped the music industry. Why purchase that fancy new iPhone case, after all, when you can just grab the digital CAD file for free from a website and print it at home for just the cost of some plastic filament?

California-based Authentise wants to allay those fears with a new service called SendShapes. The new service, launching in Alpha status in September, aims to accomplish for 3D printing what Netflix is doing for video streaming: Making it as easy and convenient as possible for users to purchase the right to print an official design for their favorite toy figurine, smartphone dock, or table saw guard.

Under Authentise’s scheme, the creator of a 3D design would upload their file to the company’s servers, then the end user would stream the uploaded file in pieces as needed by the 3D printer. That streamed file’s good for one-time use only: Once the object is printed, all traces of it disappear on your PC. The approach is similar to how Netflix sends video files to your computer, according to MIT Technology Review.

 

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Source: news.idg.no

 

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