Carbon fiber-reinforced material used to fabricate world’s first 3D-printed vehicle

A fully functional vehicle being 3D-printed from scratch and assembled by automotive design firm Local Motors (Chandler, AZ) in the space of 44 hours has driven off the IMTS floor. A carbon fiber-reinforced compound supplied by Sabic’s Innovative Plastics business is being employed as the build material.

Local Motors collaborated with Cincinnati Incorporated (Harrison, OH), a large-scale manufacturing system builder; Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a pioneer in advanced materials research; and Sabic to develop and validate the technology and materials needed to deliver large format 3D printing technology. The vehicle is comprised of just 40 parts, with 3D prints typically emoploying between 13 to 20% carbon fiber and 87 to 80% ABS resin.

Carbon fiber-reinforced compound chosen for the world’s first 3D-printed vehicle on account of its excellent strength-to-weight ratio and high stiffness which minimizes warping during the 3D printing process, enabling enhanced aesthetics and performance.

Strati 3D-printed vehicle will drive off the show floor this Saturday.

Sabic’s LNP STAT-KON carbon fiber-reinforced compound was reportedly chosen for its excellent strength-to-weight ratio and high stiffness, which minimizes warping during the 3D printing process, enabling enhanced aesthetics and performance. Additionally, Sabic’s expertise in this emerging technology, including material selection and validation, equipment specification and processing, were said to be instrumental throughout the development process. … (Read more)

Source: PlasticsToday.com