TU Wien develops method by which tailored, tough polymers can be made at high resolution for 3D printing

TU Wien develops method by which tailored, tough polymers can be made at high resolution for 3D printing

The Technical University of Vienna (TU Wien) in Austria has developed a new approach for high-resolution 3D printing of tailored, homogenously crosslinked, tough, methacrylate-based photopolymers. Continue reading “TU Wien develops method by which tailored, tough polymers can be made at high resolution for 3D printing”

TU Wien Spin-Off Cubicure introduces new 3D Printing materials

While 3D printing technology has been responsible for many advances and inventions over the years, it’s not foolproof – some methods don’t produce items with the best material properties, and others result in surfaces that are rough and unclean. The Vienna University of Technology, better known as TU Wien, is responsible for many innovations in 3D printing materials. The university also generated a spin-off company, the startup Cubicure, which developed a new 3D printing technique called hot lithography.

TU Wien has spent years developing 3D printing processes, along with material mixtures that are well-suited for a wide variety of applications. Cubicure is a direct result of this research.

Dr. Robert Gmeiner, CEO of Cubicure, said, “3D printing already plays a key role in the production of prototypes or utility models. But even for all industrial products that are produced in small quantities or have to be tailored to the individual needs of the individual customer – such as components in the medical sector – the high-quality 3D printing offers great opportunities.” Continue reading “TU Wien Spin-Off Cubicure introduces new 3D Printing materials”

TU Wien researchers develop material analysis method for 3D printing at micrometer scale

TU Wien researchers develop material analysis method for 3D printing at micrometer scale

TU Wien is conducting research into high-precision 3D printing technology. Now, a new method is enabling researchers to look for suitable materials with greater precision than ever.

How is it possible to build a model of St Stephen’s Cathedral the size of a dust particle? Well, using TU Wien’s modern 3D-printing technology, this is no longer a problem. Unimaginably fine structures in orders of magnitude well below a micrometer can now be created using their 3D printer.

However, this process requires what are known as ‘initiator molecules’, which have very specific physical properties. Using a new analysis method, developed at the Institute of Applied Physics at TU Wien, it is now possible to examine these molecules more closely and more quickly than was previously possible and thus identify which materials allow the technology to function best. Details of this technology were recently published in the physics journal ‘Applied Physics Letters’. Continue reading “TU Wien researchers develop material analysis method for 3D printing at micrometer scale”