3D Printing in a Fraction of the Time (Video)

3D Printing in a Fraction of the Time

By using laser-generated, hologram-like 3D images flashed into photosensitive resin, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, along with academic collaborators, have discovered they can build complex 3D parts in a fraction of the time of traditional layer-by-layer printing. With this process, researchers have printed beams, planes, struts at arbitrary angles, lattices and complex and uniquely curved objects in a matter of seconds.

While additive manufacturing (AM), commonly known as 3D printing, is enabling engineers and scientists to build parts in configurations and designs never before possible, the impact of the technology has been limited by layer-based printing methods, which can take up to hours or days to build three-dimensional parts, depending on their complexity. Continue reading “3D Printing in a Fraction of the Time (Video)”

New frontier in 3D Printing materials: fur, brushes and bristles (Video)

These days, it may seem as if 3-D printers can spit out just about anything, from a full-sized sports car, to edible food, to human skin. But some things have defied the technology, including hair, fur, and other dense arrays of extremely fine features, which require a huge amount of computational time and power to first design, then print.

Now researchers in MIT’s Media Lab have found a way to bypass a major design step in 3-D printing, to quickly and efficiently model and print thousands of hair-like structures. Instead of using conventional computer-aided design (CAD) software to draw thousands of individual hairs on a computer — a step that would take hours to compute — the team built a new software platform, called “Cilllia,” that lets users define the angle, thickness, density, and height of thousands of hairs, in just a few minutes. Continue reading “New frontier in 3D Printing materials: fur, brushes and bristles (Video)”

Researchers Develop Algorithm to 3D Print Vibrational Sounds (Video)

What if we could ease the design of musical instruments while also making their shapes wildly different, and use these underlying techniques to reduce unwanted sounds and vibrations in everyday objects?

In creating what looks to be a simple musical instrument — a glockenspiel with keys shaped like zoo animals — computer scientists at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), Columbia Engineering, Disney Research, and MIT have demonstrated that they can control the sound of an object by altering its shape through computational design. Continue reading “Researchers Develop Algorithm to 3D Print Vibrational Sounds (Video)”

MIT Researchers 3D print synthetic spider webs to help design materials with high strength & low density

Of all of the things in the natural world, spider webs have consistently been one of the more fascinating biological structures known to man.  Between its high-strength properties (ounce for ounce it’s stronger than steel) to its complex mathematical patterns, the spider’s web is nothing short of one of nature’s most impressive structures.   Continue reading “MIT Researchers 3D print synthetic spider webs to help design materials with high strength & low density”

MIT Students Develop Design Program that Automatically Creates Fabricable Parts (VIDEO)

A new 3D modelling program from students at MIT consists of a large database of fabricable design templates that will allow a casual user to easily create 3D objects that are ready to fabricate, including any support structures, screws, brackets or braces needed to create stable furniture. Continue reading “MIT Students Develop Design Program that Automatically Creates Fabricable Parts (VIDEO)”

Ice cream could be the next 3D-printed food on the menu

Three MIT students have been showing off a modified 3D printer that can produce customized ice cream shapes, and if the process is refined successfully you could be having your desserts to order in the near future. Using a Solidoodle printer and a Cuisinart soft-serve ice cream machine the team was able to produce designs within a self-imposed 15-minute window. Continue reading “Ice cream could be the next 3D-printed food on the menu”

Squishy robots: Phase-changing material could allow even low-cost robots to switch between hard and soft states

In the movie “Terminator 2,” the shape-shifting T-1000 robot morphs into a liquid state to squeeze through tight spaces or to repair itself when harmed. Now a phase-changing material built from wax and foam, and capable of switching between hard and soft states, could allow even low-cost robots to perform the same feat. Continue reading “Squishy robots: Phase-changing material could allow even low-cost robots to switch between hard and soft states”

3D-Printing Materials that Resist Flaws, Fractures

MIT graduate student Leon Dimas is no stranger to resilience: At 18, as a rising soccer star, the long-armed goalkeeper was a promising prospect who played for the youth academy of Rosenborg BK, a top-ranked Norwegian soccer club. He was set, it seemed, on a path that would allow him to pursue a professional career playing the game that was his first love. Continue reading “3D-Printing Materials that Resist Flaws, Fractures”