Fine glass is the latest material to be manufactured additively (Video)

Fine glass is the latest material to be manufactured additively. Glassmaking began 4,500 years ago, in Mesopotamia. The industry’s first products were trinkets, such as beads and pendants, cast from moulds and carved by hand. But craftsmen quickly worked out how to make more practical stuff, such as jugs, bottles and drinking vessels, by coiling strands of molten glass around a sand or clay core of appropriate shape, which could then be shaken or scraped out after the glass had cooled. Continue reading “Fine glass is the latest material to be manufactured additively (Video)”

i.materialise Introduces Smooth Detail Resin for Scale Modelers

Once again we’re proud to announce a new member in our growing family of 3D print materials! This time we would like to introduce the official trial of a high-detail material that is perfect for scale modelers: Smooth Detail Resin! Featuring a smooth surface, an extreme level of detail due to its 50 μm layers, and a gray color that’s perfect for painting, this material is what many of you have been waiting for. Let’s take a closer look! Continue reading “i.materialise Introduces Smooth Detail Resin for Scale Modelers”

Corentin Coulais, FOM Institute AMOLF, Presents: “Designing and fabricating Flexible Metamaterials to bridge the gap between Matter and Machine”

Because of the processes that form them, natural and artificial materials are always periodic or fully disordered, which limits their potential in particular to perform complex and controllable mechanical tasks (e.g. change of shape). Here we introduce a combinatorial strategy, which we combine with 3D printing of flexible materials to create three-dimensional materials, with a controlled level of disorder. Thanks to a complex spatial arrangement of flexible units (“voxels”), our 3D aperiodic materials can be programmed to exhibit novel “pixel” mechanics. Continue reading “Corentin Coulais, FOM Institute AMOLF, Presents: “Designing and fabricating Flexible Metamaterials to bridge the gap between Matter and Machine””

Metals are the fastest growing segment of 3D Printing, metal sales growing by 32%

Building metal parts is the only way 3D printing can become productive. Plastic 3D printing has its place in prototyping and education, but 3D printing in metal will allow the technology to be used to manufacture final production parts in a wide variety of industries. Metals are the fastest-growing segment of 3D printing, with printer sales growing at 48% and material sales growing at 32%. Continue reading “Metals are the fastest growing segment of 3D Printing, metal sales growing by 32%”

Specavia Presents Construction-Focused 3D Printer (Video)

2015 has seen a fair number of construction-related 3D printing stories make headlines, including Chinese firms 3D printing and assembling whole buildings and Tennessee’s Branch Technology developing a unique commercial endeavor for 3D printing only the walls themselves. Central and Eastern Europe are no strangers to the trend, either, as Slovenia’s BetAbram has demonstrated and, now, 3D Print Expo Moscow will be showcasing a new construction-focused 3D printer from a Russian company called Specavia. Continue reading “Specavia Presents Construction-Focused 3D Printer (Video)”