Strength of 3D Printed Polymer Parts (VIDEO)

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Presentation / interview with César Stüpp, Brightlands Materials Center / TNO.

Fused filament fabrication (FFF) is a very versatile AM technique, although it is widely used for prototyping due to their limited mechanical properties, especially in between layers. To approach this matter, a novel technique was developed in which the strength in between layers was increased in 184%, which results in stronger parts.

Continue reading “Strength of 3D Printed Polymer Parts (VIDEO)”

New technology revolutionizes 3D metal printing, LED instead of laser or electron beam

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Graz University of Technology has developed a technology that uses LED instead of laser sources for the additive manufacturing of metal parts and optimizes 3D metal printing in terms of construction time, metal powder consumption, equipment costs and post-processing effort. Selective LED-based melting (SLEDM) – i.e. the targeted melting of metal powder using high-power LED light sources – is the name of the new technology that a team led by Franz Haas, head of the Institute of Production Engineering at TU Graz, has developed for 3D metal printing and has now applied for a patent.

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TU Wien Spin-Off Cubicure introduces new 3D Printing materials

While 3D printing technology has been responsible for many advances and inventions over the years, it’s not foolproof – some methods don’t produce items with the best material properties, and others result in surfaces that are rough and unclean. The Vienna University of Technology, better known as TU Wien, is responsible for many innovations in 3D printing materials. The university also generated a spin-off company, the startup Cubicure, which developed a new 3D printing technique called hot lithography.

TU Wien has spent years developing 3D printing processes, along with material mixtures that are well-suited for a wide variety of applications. Cubicure is a direct result of this research.

Dr. Robert Gmeiner, CEO of Cubicure, said, “3D printing already plays a key role in the production of prototypes or utility models. But even for all industrial products that are produced in small quantities or have to be tailored to the individual needs of the individual customer – such as components in the medical sector – the high-quality 3D printing offers great opportunities.” Continue reading “TU Wien Spin-Off Cubicure introduces new 3D Printing materials”

ESI, Cardenal Herrera University launch joint research program on virtual manufacturing of materials

ESI Group is a leading innovator in Virtual Prototyping software and services for manufacturing industries, announces the launch of a 5-year joint research program with the CEU Cardenal Herrera University (CEU-UCH) in Valencia, Spain. The aim of this program is to achieve a significant technological leap in the field of virtual manufacturing of materials through the creation of an Endowed Chair at the University and by facilitating high level training in this field. Continue reading “ESI, Cardenal Herrera University launch joint research program on virtual manufacturing of materials”

3D printed concrete walls more stable with mechanistic model developed by TU/e researcher

A professor of Applied Mechanics at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands has developed a model for determining the dimensions and printing speeds needed to keep 3D printed concrete walls stable.

Construction 3D printing is an exciting area of additive manufacturing, but 3D printing with concrete-type materials doesn’t come without its problems. This is basically because 3D printed concrete is asked to do a lot more work than it is used to: while normal concrete deposited in formwork can harden over several weeks, 3D printed concrete needs to carry the burden of the next layer almost immediately after its deposition. Continue reading “3D printed concrete walls more stable with mechanistic model developed by TU/e researcher”

Autonomous 3D scanner determines 3D printability of objects in real time

Let’s say the armrest is broken in your vintage car. As things stand, you would need a lot of luck and persistence to find the right spare part. But in the world of Industrie 4.0 and production with batch sizes of one, you can simply scan the armrest and print it out. This is made possible by the first ever 3D scanner capable of working autonomously and in real time.

Part of the charm of vintage cars is that they stopped making them long ago, so it is special when you do see one out on the roads. If something breaks or stops working in the vehicle, however, this special status quickly becomes a problem, as spare parts are no longer manufactured either. With the advent of Industrie 4.0, this is set to change: manufacturing is turning toward batch sizes of one and individualized production. This is sometimes also referred to as “highly customized mass production.” Continue reading “Autonomous 3D scanner determines 3D printability of objects in real time”

Spare parts stored digitally & 3D printed when needed, a competitive advantage (Video)

Spare parts stored digitally & 3D printed when needed, a competitive advantage

Five percent of spare parts could currently be stored in digital warehouses. This would make parts more quickly and easily available, while creating considerable cost savings. Digitalisation will also enable individual customisation and an increase in the intelligence of parts. 

A two-year project involving companies, and led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Aalto University, investigated how businesses can gain a competitive advantage from digital spare parts.

Spare parts and all of the related information can be stored and transferred digitally. Availability increases when a new spare part can be 3D-printed according to need, close to the end user.

“Industry now has every opportunity to boost business by making spare parts into a focus area of development. Around five percent of parts can currently be manufactured digitally, according to need. 3D printing technology has reached the stage where high-quality manufacturing is possible,” says Sini Metsä-Kortelainen, VTT’s project manager for the project. Continue reading “Spare parts stored digitally & 3D printed when needed, a competitive advantage (Video)”

Renishaw, Identify3D to offer an end-to-end, secure digital manufacturing process

Renishaw, Identify3D to offer an end-to-end, secure digital manufacturing process

Renishaw, a world leader in metrology and additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, and Identify3D, a leader in software for the digital supply chain, are pleased to announce a collaboration to offer an end-to-end, secure digital manufacturing process.

Identify3D will provide data protection coupled with contractual and manufacturing licensing from design to production on Renishaw AM systems. By choosing to secure all digital data in the engineering phase, the technology enables users of Renishaw systems to protect their digital intellectual property (IP), enforce production rules and provide traceability in the digital supply chain at the industry’s highest standard.

“Renishaw understands how important it is to have an efficient and reliable control of data flow all the way to its machines,” said Stephan Thomas, Chief Strategy Officer at Identify3D. “We are pleased that Renishaw, one of the world’s leading engineering and scientific technology companies, has selected Identify3D as a strategic partner to provide such a solution to the market place — from design to distribution and production.” Continue reading “Renishaw, Identify3D to offer an end-to-end, secure digital manufacturing process”

VTT Finland is developing 3D printing materials for wound care

VTT Finland is developing 3D printing materials for wound care

Cellulose nanofibrils have properties that can improve the characteristics of bio-based 3D-printing pastes. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is developing a 3D wound care product for monitoring wound condition in hospital care. However, the first commercial nanocellulose applications will be seen in indoor decoration elements, textiles and the production of mock-ups.

3D printing has proven to be an efficient manufacturing method for complex, customised and light structures. In addition to thermoplastics, 3D printing materials include metals, ceramics and foodstuffs. The range of biomaterials in 3D paste printing is still fairly limited, since pastes pose unique challenges: their structure must not collapse during printing and the objects manufactured must remain sufficiently strong, rigid or flexible after drying. In 3D biomaterial filaments, however, commercial products already exist. Continue reading “VTT Finland is developing 3D printing materials for wound care”