VTT Finland is developing 3D printing materials for wound care

VTT Finland is developing 3D printing materials for wound care

Cellulose nanofibrils have properties that can improve the characteristics of bio-based 3D-printing pastes. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is developing a 3D wound care product for monitoring wound condition in hospital care. However, the first commercial nanocellulose applications will be seen in indoor decoration elements, textiles and the production of mock-ups.

3D printing has proven to be an efficient manufacturing method for complex, customised and light structures. In addition to thermoplastics, 3D printing materials include metals, ceramics and foodstuffs. The range of biomaterials in 3D paste printing is still fairly limited, since pastes pose unique challenges: their structure must not collapse during printing and the objects manufactured must remain sufficiently strong, rigid or flexible after drying. In 3D biomaterial filaments, however, commercial products already exist. Continue reading “VTT Finland is developing 3D printing materials for wound care”

15 year-old creates a 3D printed iPhone case that’s also a stethoscope

When high school student Suman Mulumudi got his hands on a 3D printer, he decided to make an iPhone case, but one which really stood out from the crowd. It’s not covered in bizarre shapes, it’s not compatible with Lego, and it doesn’t have an unusual picture burned into it. No, it does something not only useful, but also unique. Continue reading “15 year-old creates a 3D printed iPhone case that’s also a stethoscope”

Can Your iPhone Combined With 3D Printing Really Produce A More Pleasurable Insole?

We keep hearing about 3D printers and all the customized products just waiting to be newly hatched, but where are all these wonders of the digitized world? With some fanfare, then, a fresh company has arrived to reinvent the orthotic. Yes, the humble orthotic, worn by grim-mouthed uncles and hard-faced professional women, is about to receive a face-lift. Continue reading “Can Your iPhone Combined With 3D Printing Really Produce A More Pleasurable Insole?”

3D Printed Exoskeleton Helps Amanda Boxtel Walk Again (VIDEO)

In 1992, Amanda Boxtel was involved in a catastrophic skiing accident and became paralyzed from the waist down. But now, nearly 20 years after the skiing accident, Boxtel took her first steps since the accident – despite her paralysis. Thanks to the recently revealed 3D printed hybrid exoskeleton robotic suit, Boxtel was standing tall in Budapest, and was walking on her own. Continue reading “3D Printed Exoskeleton Helps Amanda Boxtel Walk Again (VIDEO)”

3D Printed Radiotherapy Mask Eases Patient’s Cancer Treatment (VIDEO)

Medical treatments including prostheses, accurate models for surgery and implants are all known and documented applications of 3D printing (with 3D printed organs on the way) that require high precision (and often high cost) 3D printing processes. One aspect that has not yet been sufficiently explored, and that may be a gateway to consumer adoption of 3D printing, is the use of more basic 3D manufacturing technologies to create products that are borderline, that is they can have a medical use but do not necessarily require hard to obtain medical approvals and permits to be used. Continue reading “3D Printed Radiotherapy Mask Eases Patient’s Cancer Treatment (VIDEO)”

3D printing in healthcare improving third world medicine & transplants

Much has been said in the past about the power and potential of 3D printers, but the technology itself continues to evolve and deliver new experiences over time. The latest applications of its use are changing both third-world accessibility to important medical supplies and bringing sci-fi to the cutting edge of the health care world. Continue reading “3D printing in healthcare improving third world medicine & transplants”

3D Printing Permits Medical Students to Cut Costs and See Less Exposure to X-Rays

In high school, the Anatomy class took a field trip to the USC Kinesiology Lab to see the real human body. For some it was a harrowing experience, and not just because of the exposed organs. They learned that medical students often practice surgical procedures on cadavers. This is a good thing. Residents and doctors operating on vulnerable and ailing people ought to be honed and ready for the job. Medical students also must learn to operate heavy machinery with exposure to radiation with such devices as the C-arm. The name matches the machine which can inspect vital organs like the kidney. However, researchers at the University of Minnesota have found a safer and more cost-effective method for training by utilizing 3D printers and materials from Stratasys. Continue reading “3D Printing Permits Medical Students to Cut Costs and See Less Exposure to X-Rays”