TU Wien develops method by which tailored, tough polymers can be made at high resolution for 3D printing

TU Wien develops method by which tailored, tough polymers can be made at high resolution for 3D printing

The Technical University of Vienna (TU Wien) in Austria has developed a new approach for high-resolution 3D printing of tailored, homogenously crosslinked, tough, methacrylate-based photopolymers. Continue reading “TU Wien develops method by which tailored, tough polymers can be made at high resolution for 3D printing”

New steel material for additive manufacturing used by GKN Sinter Metals and Porsche Engineering

Today’s automotive manufacturers are faced with the ever-increasing demand of improving vehicle efficiency. Manufacturers have tackled the problem from all angles: reducing weight, creating more efficient internal combustion engines, improving powertrains, and reducing noise. But to achieve a more efficient performing vehicle, the automotive market has started using a new process.

Metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) brings a natural competitive advantage for time to-market contraction of new ideas and for the development of innovative solutions. AM is used for prototyping parts with quality fit and function. The process has also been used to mass manufacture parts that require a unique shape, typically impossible to achieve via traditional machining. Continue reading “New steel material for additive manufacturing used by GKN Sinter Metals and Porsche Engineering”

TU Wien Spin-Off Cubicure introduces new 3D Printing materials

While 3D printing technology has been responsible for many advances and inventions over the years, it’s not foolproof – some methods don’t produce items with the best material properties, and others result in surfaces that are rough and unclean. The Vienna University of Technology, better known as TU Wien, is responsible for many innovations in 3D printing materials. The university also generated a spin-off company, the startup Cubicure, which developed a new 3D printing technique called hot lithography.

TU Wien has spent years developing 3D printing processes, along with material mixtures that are well-suited for a wide variety of applications. Cubicure is a direct result of this research.

Dr. Robert Gmeiner, CEO of Cubicure, said, “3D printing already plays a key role in the production of prototypes or utility models. But even for all industrial products that are produced in small quantities or have to be tailored to the individual needs of the individual customer – such as components in the medical sector – the high-quality 3D printing offers great opportunities.” Continue reading “TU Wien Spin-Off Cubicure introduces new 3D Printing materials”

ESI, Cardenal Herrera University launch joint research program on virtual manufacturing of materials

ESI Group is a leading innovator in Virtual Prototyping software and services for manufacturing industries, announces the launch of a 5-year joint research program with the CEU Cardenal Herrera University (CEU-UCH) in Valencia, Spain. The aim of this program is to achieve a significant technological leap in the field of virtual manufacturing of materials through the creation of an Endowed Chair at the University and by facilitating high level training in this field. Continue reading “ESI, Cardenal Herrera University launch joint research program on virtual manufacturing of materials”

TU/e researcher develops mechanistic model to keep 3D printed concrete walls stable

A professor of Applied Mechanics at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands has developed a model for determining the dimensions and printing speeds needed to keep 3D printed concrete walls stable.

Construction 3D printing is an exciting area of additive manufacturing, but 3D printing with concrete-type materials doesn’t come without its problems. This is basically because 3D printed concrete is asked to do a lot more work than it is used to: while normal concrete deposited in formwork can harden over several weeks, 3D printed concrete needs to carry the burden of the next layer almost immediately after its deposition. Continue reading “TU/e researcher develops mechanistic model to keep 3D printed concrete walls stable”

Colour-changing 3D Printables, with custom ink & ultraviolet light (Video)

3-D printing has come a long way since the first rapid prototyping patent was rejected in 1980. The technology has evolved from basic designs to a wide range of highly-customizable objects. Still, there’s a big issue: Once objects are printed, they’re final. If you need a change, you’ll need a reprint.

But imagine if that weren’t the case — if, for example, you could change the color of your smartphone case or earrings on demand.

Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have gotten closer to making that a reality. In a new paper, they present ColorMod, a method for repeatedly changing the colors of 3-D printed objects, after fabrication.

Using their own 3-D printable ink that changes color when exposed to ultraviolet light, the team can recolor a multicolored object in just over 20 minutes — and they say they expect that number to decrease significantly with future improvements. Continue reading “Colour-changing 3D Printables, with custom ink & ultraviolet light (Video)”

Spare parts stored digitally & 3D printed when needed, a competitive advantage (Video)

Spare parts stored digitally & 3D printed when needed, a competitive advantage

Five percent of spare parts could currently be stored in digital warehouses. This would make parts more quickly and easily available, while creating considerable cost savings. Digitalisation will also enable individual customisation and an increase in the intelligence of parts. 

A two-year project involving companies, and led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Aalto University, investigated how businesses can gain a competitive advantage from digital spare parts.

Spare parts and all of the related information can be stored and transferred digitally. Availability increases when a new spare part can be 3D-printed according to need, close to the end user.

“Industry now has every opportunity to boost business by making spare parts into a focus area of development. Around five percent of parts can currently be manufactured digitally, according to need. 3D printing technology has reached the stage where high-quality manufacturing is possible,” says Sini Metsä-Kortelainen, VTT’s project manager for the project. Continue reading “Spare parts stored digitally & 3D printed when needed, a competitive advantage (Video)”

3D Printing in a Fraction of the Time (Video)

3D Printing in a Fraction of the Time

By using laser-generated, hologram-like 3D images flashed into photosensitive resin, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, along with academic collaborators, have discovered they can build complex 3D parts in a fraction of the time of traditional layer-by-layer printing. With this process, researchers have printed beams, planes, struts at arbitrary angles, lattices and complex and uniquely curved objects in a matter of seconds.

While additive manufacturing (AM), commonly known as 3D printing, is enabling engineers and scientists to build parts in configurations and designs never before possible, the impact of the technology has been limited by layer-based printing methods, which can take up to hours or days to build three-dimensional parts, depending on their complexity. Continue reading “3D Printing in a Fraction of the Time (Video)”

GE Additive acquires simulation software developer GeonX

GE Additive announced that it has acquired GeonX, a privately-owned developer of simulation software.  Terms of the deal are not being disclosed.

Headquarted in Belgium, GeonX provides software for engineers when developing new products, to simulate additive manufacturing, welding, machining and heat treatment processes in various industries such as aerospace, automotive and energy.

GeonX’s simulation software tool, Virfac® (short for Virtual Factory), assesses products prior to production; predicting defects, distortions and stresses and the impact manufacturing has on a product’s durability. This helps to reduce the number of prototypes built during the development phase, while improving the quality and lifetime of the manufactured products. This can minimize the time to market and development costs. Continue reading “GE Additive acquires simulation software developer GeonX”

RICOH’s Additive Manufacturing capabilities to extend for wider range of end-use parts

RICOH’s Additive Manufacturing capabilities to extend for wider range of end-use parts

BASF, the world’s leading chemical company, and Ricoh, the leading technology supplier in the field of laser sintering machines for 3D printing of plastic powders, are evolving their Additive Manufacturing capabilities through a development partnership.

BASF and Ricoh are collaborating on materials, processing and application development to bring further innovation to the market.  The partnership also includes development of new materials for the RICOH AM S5500P, which has been installed by BASF in its 3D-P Application Technology Center in Heidelberg. The agreement will increase the capabilities of the high-end plastic sintering production machines.

Greg Plowman, Director of Ricoh Europe’s European Additive Manufacturing Business Group said: “The wider success of the AM market in the coming years rests on the crucial advances made in material sciences. These improvements will pave the way for creative implementations in new verticals and industries. By partnering with BASF as one of the largest material manufacturers in the world, we can jointly enhance our development expertise to meet specific and advanced customer requirements for end-use parts.”  Continue reading “RICOH’s Additive Manufacturing capabilities to extend for wider range of end-use parts”