New steel material for additive manufacturing used by GKN Sinter Metals and Porsche Engineering

Today’s automotive manufacturers are faced with the ever-increasing demand of improving vehicle efficiency. Manufacturers have tackled the problem from all angles: reducing weight, creating more efficient internal combustion engines, improving powertrains, and reducing noise. But to achieve a more efficient performing vehicle, the automotive market has started using a new process.

Metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) brings a natural competitive advantage for time to-market contraction of new ideas and for the development of innovative solutions. AM is used for prototyping parts with quality fit and function. The process has also been used to mass manufacture parts that require a unique shape, typically impossible to achieve via traditional machining. Continue reading “New steel material for additive manufacturing used by GKN Sinter Metals and Porsche Engineering”

ESI, Cardenal Herrera University launch joint research program on virtual manufacturing of materials

ESI Group is a leading innovator in Virtual Prototyping software and services for manufacturing industries, announces the launch of a 5-year joint research program with the CEU Cardenal Herrera University (CEU-UCH) in Valencia, Spain. The aim of this program is to achieve a significant technological leap in the field of virtual manufacturing of materials through the creation of an Endowed Chair at the University and by facilitating high level training in this field. Continue reading “ESI, Cardenal Herrera University launch joint research program on virtual manufacturing of materials”

3D printed concrete walls more stable with mechanistic model developed by TU/e researcher

A professor of Applied Mechanics at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands has developed a model for determining the dimensions and printing speeds needed to keep 3D printed concrete walls stable.

Construction 3D printing is an exciting area of additive manufacturing, but 3D printing with concrete-type materials doesn’t come without its problems. This is basically because 3D printed concrete is asked to do a lot more work than it is used to: while normal concrete deposited in formwork can harden over several weeks, 3D printed concrete needs to carry the burden of the next layer almost immediately after its deposition. Continue reading “3D printed concrete walls more stable with mechanistic model developed by TU/e researcher”

Autonomous 3D scanner determines 3D printability of objects in real time

Let’s say the armrest is broken in your vintage car. As things stand, you would need a lot of luck and persistence to find the right spare part. But in the world of Industrie 4.0 and production with batch sizes of one, you can simply scan the armrest and print it out. This is made possible by the first ever 3D scanner capable of working autonomously and in real time.

Part of the charm of vintage cars is that they stopped making them long ago, so it is special when you do see one out on the roads. If something breaks or stops working in the vehicle, however, this special status quickly becomes a problem, as spare parts are no longer manufactured either. With the advent of Industrie 4.0, this is set to change: manufacturing is turning toward batch sizes of one and individualized production. This is sometimes also referred to as “highly customized mass production.” Continue reading “Autonomous 3D scanner determines 3D printability of objects in real time”

World’s first 3D printed concrete cycle bridge opened in The Netherlands

World’s first 3D printed concrete cycle bridge opened in The Netherlands

Today world’s first 3D printed reinforced, pre-stressed concrete bridge was opened. The cycle bridge is part of a new road around the village of Gemert, in the Netherlands. It was printed at Eindhoven University of Technology. With the knowledge the researchers gained in this project, they are now able to design even larger printed concrete structures.

Five-ton load
The bridge is the first civil infrastructure project to be realized with 3D-concrete printing. The bridge is 8 meters long (clear span 6.5 meters) and 3.5 meters wide. As it is a ‘worlds first’, the developers did not take any chances and tested the bridge by putting a load of 5 tons on it, which is a lot more than the load the bridge will actually carry.

Thirty years
The bridge has to meet all regular requirements of course. It is designed to do its duty – to carry cyclists – for thirty years or more. With more cycles than people in the Netherlands, it is expected that hundreds of cyclists will ride over the printed bridge every day. It is part of a large road construction project, led by the company BAM Infra, and commissioned by the province of North-Brabant. Continue reading “World’s first 3D printed concrete cycle bridge opened in The Netherlands”

Can MES software significantly transform Additive Manufacturing design?

Can MES software significantly transform Additive Manufacturing design?

In the world of advanced manufacturing, the term MES to describe software based Manufacturing Execution Systems is already fairly common. However, it is only now beginning to be introduced to AM, leading us to coin a new “AMES” (Additive Manufacturing Execution Systems) acronym. This is occurring now because only recently did AM start to become a true batch and potentially even a mass manufacturing technology.

Major industrial software developers already provide several MES solution but only a few are able to adapt these solutions to the unique characteristics of the end-to-end 3D printing production cycle, integrating strictly digital elements such as quotation enginers all the way to ERP, CRM and even 3D file protecion features. Continue reading “Can MES software significantly transform Additive Manufacturing design?”

TU Wien researchers develop material analysis method for 3D printing at micrometer scale

TU Wien researchers develop material analysis method for 3D printing at micrometer scale

TU Wien is conducting research into high-precision 3D printing technology. Now, a new method is enabling researchers to look for suitable materials with greater precision than ever.

How is it possible to build a model of St Stephen’s Cathedral the size of a dust particle? Well, using TU Wien’s modern 3D-printing technology, this is no longer a problem. Unimaginably fine structures in orders of magnitude well below a micrometer can now be created using their 3D printer.

However, this process requires what are known as ‘initiator molecules’, which have very specific physical properties. Using a new analysis method, developed at the Institute of Applied Physics at TU Wien, it is now possible to examine these molecules more closely and more quickly than was previously possible and thus identify which materials allow the technology to function best. Details of this technology were recently published in the physics journal ‘Applied Physics Letters’. Continue reading “TU Wien researchers develop material analysis method for 3D printing at micrometer scale”

New 3D printed polymer that could be used in space, developed by Virginia Tech Team

New 3D printed polymer that could be used in space, developed by Virginia Tech Team.

Newswise — Virginia Tech researchers have created a novel way to 3-D print the type of high-temperature polymeric materials commonly used to insulate space craft and satellites from extreme heat and cold.

Previously, the polyimide could previously be made only in sheets.

The material, formally known as Kapton, is an aromatic polymer composed of carbons and hydrogens inside benzene rings, which provides exceptional thermal and chemical stability. But because of this molecular structure, the material is notoriously difficult to produce in any format other than thin sheets. Kapton often is used in the multi-layer insulation that forms the outer wrapping of spacecraft, satellites, and planetary rovers to protect them from extreme heat and cold. It often is mistaken for “gold foil.” Continue reading “New 3D printed polymer that could be used in space, developed by Virginia Tech Team”

Prospective Alliance Partnership to help companies implement additive manufacturing in industrial applications

Prospective Alliance Partnership to help companies implement additive manufacturing in industrial applications

Dassault Systèmes  the 3DEXPERIENCE Company, world leader in 3D design software, 3D Digital Mock Up and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) solutions, and Sogeti High Tech, a subsidiary of Capgemini Group dedicated to industrial engineering and technological innovation, today announced that they have entered into negotiations to sign an additive manufacturing project development and management alliance partnership.  The prospective alliance partnership will provide companies in aerospace and defense, energy, transportation and other industries with integrated solutions to explore and implement the use of additive manufacturing in industrial applications. Continue reading “Prospective Alliance Partnership to help companies implement additive manufacturing in industrial applications”

REMINDER: Sign up now for Additive Manufacturing training workshops

Registration has opened for the Additive Manufacturing training Workshops on Fundamentals of AM Designs and Selecting AM Materials & Processes, organized by UL and Brightlands Materials Center. Join us!

Fundamentals of AM Designs is scheduled for Tuesday, January 31, 2017 and Selecting AM Materials & Processes is scheduled for Wednesday, February 1, 2017. The Workshops take place at the Brightlands Chemelot Campus (BCC) in Geleen, The Netherlands, just before the 3D Printing Materials Conference of February 2 at the same location. Both courses will be offered as condensed single day workshops at a price of €650 per participant per workshop. The workshops will be led by Paul Bates, Manager of the UL Additive Manufacturing Competency Center.

Continue reading “REMINDER: Sign up now for Additive Manufacturing training workshops”