New 3D printed polymer that could be used in space, developed by Virginia Tech Team

New 3D printed polymer that could be used in space, developed by Virginia Tech Team.

Newswise — Virginia Tech researchers have created a novel way to 3-D print the type of high-temperature polymeric materials commonly used to insulate space craft and satellites from extreme heat and cold.

Previously, the polyimide could previously be made only in sheets.

The material, formally known as Kapton, is an aromatic polymer composed of carbons and hydrogens inside benzene rings, which provides exceptional thermal and chemical stability. But because of this molecular structure, the material is notoriously difficult to produce in any format other than thin sheets. Kapton often is used in the multi-layer insulation that forms the outer wrapping of spacecraft, satellites, and planetary rovers to protect them from extreme heat and cold. It often is mistaken for “gold foil.” Continue reading “New 3D printed polymer that could be used in space, developed by Virginia Tech Team”

Carbon3D introduces CLIP, breakthrough technology for layerless 3D printing

Carbon3D today emerged from stealth on the main stage of the TED conference with an innovative approach to polymer-based 3D printing that promises to advance the industry beyond basic prototyping to 3D manufacturing. The new Continuous Liquid Interface Production technology (CLIP) harnesses light and oxygen to continuously grow objects… Continue reading “Carbon3D introduces CLIP, breakthrough technology for layerless 3D printing”

Welcome Aboard: The First 3D Printer in Space Docks at the ISS (VIDEO)

It’s official! A 3D printer has made it into space! Last weekend, the uncrewed Dragon spacecraft from Space X was loaded up with 5,000 pounds of cargo, including one piece of baggage precious to those in the 3D printing community: the Made In Space Zero G Printer, a 3D printer specifically designed to operate in the absence of gravity. Continue reading “Welcome Aboard: The First 3D Printer in Space Docks at the ISS (VIDEO)”